Confusing words 3

 

I get very stressful when I am under pressure.

 

For those of you who have already looked under unit 5, page 100 of TEE, this is a very similar error to the one mentioned there. So why is it under confusing words and not grammar? Basically, these words are a bit more confusing to students.

 

We will begin with the correction: it should be I get very stressed when I am under pressure. Some natives even say I get very stressed out when I am under pressure.

 

Basically, both stressed and stressful are adjectives, but if something or someone is stressed, stressed out, or under stress, they feel tense and anxious, worrying about a situation they may or may not be experiencing at that time: Everyone is really stressed out at home because of the financial situation. Many people at the company are under stress because of new targets. But if something or someone is stressful, then they are the cause or the reason for the person involved to feel stress. They are the object of the stress the person is experiencing: Exams are very stressful.

 

The noun and verb stress also has other meanings. To emphasise a point because you feel it is important: I should stress these new rules do not affect everybody. There is more stress on making money than keeping telephone operatives happy in many businesses. Stress is also strong pressure added to something: If you put too much stress on that wooden bar, it will break

 

But to finish: if you are very stressful, it is you who is causing the stress.

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